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Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)
that broadwell was sending the threatening e-mails and he's the cia director. i mean there's just too much there. there's just too much there about what's going on. >> rose: david? >> i just would caution norah on one detail in that account, which is that it was petraeus that ended the affair, whatever it ended. >> this is in "the washington post," i'm just quoting "the washington post." >> i understand that. >> rose: david's newspaper. >> it's my newspaper but i didn't write that story. it's my understanding that that may actually not be accurate. but that the ending may have been prompted by broadwell. the truth is we don't know about that but my information is a little different from what was printed in the paper. >> rose: go ahead, continue david. >> well i think, you know, the issue that would concern the fbi and would make this something significant is whether our cia director, the person who knows more secrets than anyone else in the u.s. government isn't in any way under a threat, under pressure from somebody else such that he would be vulnerable, you know, blackmail overstatements it
and really well for the cia job. he's dealing with heads of state, administers of defense and intelligence officials he dealt with. >> rose: he's not going to be chairman of the joint chiefs a job he might have wished for in the culmination of his military career. how did he take that. >> he was told by second gates in 2010 he wasn't considered. gates came out to check the war and came back and met with petraeus in his office and said you're the key to our expectations, you being the force and the progress and the surge. but i have bad news. you're not being considered. and it stung. he really felt that you know he had stepped down. >> rose: he felt he earned it. >> he felt he earned it, he thought he should be considered but he had mixed feelings actual actually about this position and he thought about other positions he would be interested in military. specifically the cia. he thought about keeping the union form on and going to the cia. he proposed that to second gats having liked the idea because he served there before. >> rose: as director. >> right exactly. he took it back to the
brown: new details emerge about the affair that led to the resignation of c.i.a. director david petraeus and about when the f.b.i. first uncover evidence of it. good evening. i'm geoffrey brown. >> ifill: and i'm gwen ifill. on the newshour tonight we get the latest on the time line as we know it and the implications for the intelligence agency. >> brown: then gay rights add voaks won their first victory at the ballot box last week. ray suarez examines the significance of voters in three states approving same-sex marriage. of >> when they see us on their front doorstep >> ifill: special correspondent john tulenko tells the story of teachers coming to the rescue of families in storm-ravaged new jersey. knocking and they realize it's us and we're here to see if they're okay, their faces lit up. >> brown: and we have three reports about veterans, beginning with a pro publica investigation into lost or destroyed combat records. >> ifill: then we talk with a veteran who has written about w we choose to remember those who serve. >> brown: and we close with a conversation with first-ti
continues as do their regional implications. when the head of the cia resigns after admitting to an extramarital affair and it turns out investigations have known about it for months, there are bound to be questions. the public learn about their fair and friday. patraeus step down and it was with his biographer. senior members of congress want to know why there were not told sooner. what is it that lawmakers want? congress likes to feel they're in the loop, particularly if you have the situation where there is the potential for the director of the cia to have been compromised in some sort of way. those are responsible to oversee feel that they are responsible. >> there was no criminal activity and security had not been compromised. >> the fbi is one of the 16 intelligence agencies,gence they started looking into whether or not there had been a compromise, the lawmakers who oversee the cia feel they should have at least been told that there was -- that there was something going on. >> she had some security clearance but there was question about whether she was in possession of
world news america" reporting from washington. the scam which brought down the c.i.a. director spread further. now it is the actions of the top u.s. commander in afghanistan called into question. failing its mandate, the bbc gains access into an internal report showing the united nations failed to protect civilians in sri lanka. >> they left actually at the moment the population needed them more than ever. the government wanted them out of the way essentially because they didn't want anyone to see what was happening. >> running the world in just a week. a marathon man on a mission that boo leave most of us in the dust. welcome to our viewers on public television in america and around the globe. bizarre. it is the only way to describe the scandal that has already claimed the job of the c.i.a. director and now has america's top commander in afghanistan under investigation. both are strange enough, but how do you explain the addition of a shirtless f.b.i. agent and 30,000 e-mails. here is the latest. >> it is a washington drama with a stellar cast. the spy chief, the top general and two
was disclosed. >> this week on "inside washington," a sex scandal at the top of the cia. the benghazi blame game. >> the american people deserve to know the facts. we cannot ever let this happen again. >> why would susan rice not get our vote? i don't trust her. >> defending susan rice. >> if senator mccain and senator graham and others want to go after somebody, they should go after me. >> there are no barriers to sitting down and beginning to work through this process. >> as the fiscal cliff loans, is there a deal in the works? mitt romney explains why he lost. >> the president's campaign focused on certain members of his base coalition, give them extraordinary financial gifts from the government, and worked very aggressively to turn them out to vote. captioned by the national captioning institute --www.ncicap.org-- >> well, i just don't know where to begin this week. do we talk about republican charges of a cover-up with regard to the attack in benghazi? do we talk about sexual liaisons and e-mails? to talk about israel and gaza, the possibility of the fiscal cliff? let's start with the sex.
has the latest on the surprise resignation of cia chief david petraeus after admitting to an extra-marital affair. >> brown: it's still cold and dark in many new jersey homes. special correspondent rick karr follows utility crews as they work to turn the electricity back on. >> access to these lines is quite difficult, cutting through peoples' backyards. you may come in one and cross four other yards just to get to your job site. >> woodruff: plus mark shields and david brooks analyze the week's news. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour.n >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: intel >> music is a universal language. but when i was in an accident, i was worried the healthcare system spoke on with all its own. with united healthcare, i got help that treat my life, information on my phone, connection to doctors who get where i'm from, and tools to estimate what my care may cost. so i never missed a beat. >> we're more than 78,000 people looking out for more than 70 million americans. that's health in numbers. united healthcare. >> and by the bill and melinda ga
that forced c.i.a. director petraus to resign. good evening. i'm gwen ifill. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the newshour tonight, we get the latest on what were termed "potentially inappropriate" e- mails and documents, and we examine if and when the white house and congress should have been alerted. >> ifill: then, the senate and the house of representatives get back to work. judy woodruff looks at the long list of challenges ahead. >> brown: one item on the agenda is the so-called fiscal cliff , and that was the focus of a white house meeting today with liberal leaders. we talk with two participants. >> ifill: plus, from "our food for nine billion" series, spst giepma r oadtsinorchn sa' magistad reports on china's moves to satisfy a growing demand for meat. it has transformed lives and diets over the past 30 years meat con suption per cap to has quadrupled and citdwellers eat twice as much meat on average as those in the countryside. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the en
questions about the resignation of his cia chief and the events that unfolded in benghazi. >> the president of the united states, reelected and reinvigorated with big plans for his second term. >> i hear you have some questions for me. >> not the questions he might have to imagine a week ago. instead the white house is dealing with not a sex scandal of the cia director. >> i have no evidence at this point that classified information was disclosed. >> should the fbi have told him sooner about the affair? >> i am withholding judgment as to how the entire process surrounding general petraeus up.e of we do not have all the information yet. >> general david petraeus resigned after admitting to an affair with his biographer, house last brother's night. 's file e-mails sent by pawlenty -- hostile emails sent by broadwell. barack obama is desperate to move on, but the message from capitol hill is not so fast. members of congress are troubled by questions about david petraeus. to address them, they summoned the man himself. general petraeus has agreed to give evidence behind closed doors about the k
in on two topics, starting with the spraling scandal that forced the c.i.a. director to step down. >> ifill: and we assess the administration's post-election agenda with senators dick durbin and kay bailey hutchison. >> woodruff: then, ray suarez gets the latest on the escalating violence in gaza after israeli air strikes killed the military leader of hamas. >> ifill: plus, there were new calls today for laws to police pharmacies like the one linked to the meningitis outbreak. betty ann bowser's update includes the story of one family's loss from the disease. >> i can't really think of one them them without the other. he was such a vibrant person that who lit up the room and there's such a great big hole missing. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. nkjor funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: the president faced the white house
this week with the story that is shaking up washington. the sudden resignation of cia director david petraeus. thomas ricks is a pulitzer prize-winning journalist and a best-selling author. he is a fellow at the center for a new american security. good to have you back on this program. let's get the petraeus stuff at of the way first. i want to go straight to your blog. the sudden departure of general david petraeus from the cia tells us more about the state of our nation than a dozen petraeus. president barack obama should not have accepted his resignation. we seem to care more about the sex lives of our leaders down their real lives of our soldiers. i want to pick that apart one piece at a time. he suggests that his resignation says more about the nation about him? what do you mean? >> it worries me that we can throw away the leaders so .al ra casually.il general petraeus is one of the more prominent generals of our time. the only general the american public has really been known since world war ii. a lot of generals tried and failed in iraq. petraeus succeeded. here we have a lead
world news america. aseral patras' steps down the cia director after admitting to an extramarital affair, sending shock waves through washington. and on the political front, it is back to business. can the parties to strike a deal to reverse the looming economic difficulties? a new teen-age magician in town is making quite a market in south africa. welcome to our viewers on public television in america and around the globe. it was a rather unexpected resignation. a short time ago, general david is stepping down as cia director. president obama accepted the resignation of the retired four- star general. he praised his outstanding service. michael, how much of a shock was this? >> it was pretty much a surprise, the general, as far as i know, was very well-thought of at the agency. certainly a defender of the agency and several weeks ago, he made it very clear after the attack that no one at the agency prevented assistance going to the man going under attack. it was the white house -- >> the resignation comes just ahead of hearing about been gauzy. >> it is a very peculiar thing, he was sch
after the storm. but first, the other news of the day, here's kwame holman. >> holman: former c.i.a. director david petraeus denied today he gave classified information to the woman he had an affair with, paula broadwell. he spoke to cnn. that came as the c.i.a. announced an "exploratory" investigation of petraeus' conduct. his relationship with broadwell came to light during an fbi investigation that began last summer. today, attorney general eric holder defended the bureau's decision not to alert president obama and congressional leaders. >> we made the determination as we were going through the matter that there was not a threat to national security. had we made the determination that a threat to national security existed, we would of course have made that known to the president and also to the appropriate members on the hill. >> holman: that investigation also has led to a pentagon probe of the top u.s. commander in afghanistan-- marine general john allen. he's under scrutiny for extensive communications with a tampa, florida woman. allen has denied wrongdoing. defense secretary
petraeus forced to step down as c.i.a. director after admitting to an extramarital fair with his biographer testified in secret today on capitol hill about that failure and also about who who knew what during the benghazi attack. and general john allen's nomination to be the next commander of nato forces in europe has been put on hold as the pentagon inspector general investigates his friendship with another woman. add to that the escalating tension between israel and hamas and the head spins, martha. >> you need a flow chart for this week. incredible that one week ago tonight we learned about david petraeus and that he resigned as c.i.a. director and today he is up on capitol hill testifying about benghazi. of course, this happened september 11 of this year, the attack in benghazi. a lot of different stories right away about why that happened, how that happened, but it was susan rice, u.n. ambassador, i think it was five days later on the sunday talk shows saying that she thought it came as a result of some protests and because of the egyptian in cairo, there were protests about this anti-
enrichment program. former cia director david petraeus told lawmakers today it was clear early on that terrorists attacked the u.s. consulate in benghazi, libya. petraeus answered questions behind closed doors one week after he admitted having an affair and resigned. republican congressman peter king of new york said the general's account differed from what he said right after the attack, when the administration was blaming a muslim protest. >> the testimony today was that from the start he told us it was a terrorist attack, a terrorist-involved from the start. i told him my questions have a very different recollection. the impression we were giving was the overwhelming amount of evidence was that it was arose out of a span takenuous demonstration and was not a terrorist attack. >> holman: petraeus said today the cia blamed terrorists in its initial talking points, but that reference later was dropped to avoid tipping off suspects. u.n. ambassador susan rice used the edited version in remarks five days after the attack. some republicans have accused her of downplaying the terro
's convincing re-election, the looming fiscal cliff and tonight, a c.i.a. bombshell. victory and fallout, tonight on "washington week." the lines were long. the victory party was robust. >> a long campaign is now over. and whether i earned your vote or not, i have listened to you. i have learned from you. and you've made me a better president. gwen: a the thank yous were fervert. >> i'm really proud of all of you. it will go on in history. people will read about it it. and they'll marvel about it. >> as president obama claimed his second term. the election turned out to be a lesson in truth and consequences. what did the obama campaign do right and what did the romney campaign do wrong? >> and i ran for office because i'm concerned about americans. this election is over. but our principles endure. >> the voters have their say. leaving washington to search for a compromise even as a fiscal crisis looms. >> this is an opportunity for the president to lead. this is his.
that he's going to lose his c.i.a. director because david petraeus former leader of the war effort is resigning because he admitted to an extramarital affair. there's talk about hillary clinton leaving. she herself has said she is going to leave. tim geithner said he is going to leave. how much change do we have here? and how much room does the president have to establish his second term to be? >> if you change the secretary of state and the secretary of treasury you've changed two important officers in the government. those are not insignificant departures that he's facing. the petraeus departure is totally unexpected and shocked everybody when it was announced earlier today. but they've had a lot of time to think about what they want to do on that. i don't think anything in either of those either treasury or state is going to suggest any kind of state in course. some of them are clearer than others but they've got those problems to deal with. i don't think you're going to -- it's not like it's going to be an upheaval. it doesn't feel like we're in a moment of mass exodus. there w
from new york. the cia has opened an investigation into the conduct of its former director david petraeus who resigned last week over an extramarital affair. an agency spokesman says the investigation is exploratory and does not presuppose any particular outcome. he is scheduled to testify tomorrow in front of lawmakers on the attack in benghazi. president obama has pledged ongoing federal support for areas struggling to recover after a storm sandy. he went to new york for the first time with the devastation and that with families, officials, and first responders. it has been 2.5 years since an explosion on an oil rig in the gulf of mexico killed 11 people and unleashed a massive spill. bp has agreed to pay $4.5 billion and will plead guilty to criminal charges. the announcement was made by the u.s. attorney general who traveled to new orleans for the event. >> already, this oil spill is the worst environmental disaster america has ever faced. >> many people are dead, millions of gallons of oil continued to spew into the gulf. >> it is 2.5 years since the deepwater horizon will r
and his incredible service over so many deployments and how hard that is. the fact is, he was c.i.a. director. he wasn't a general in the army any more. he was c.i.a. director. and most people i've talked to think that is a very, very different situation. >> julianna let's go back to obama fair moment. you've been watching him going on close to five years-- over four years. he's pretty confident, isn't he? he feels good, as he should, i suppose, this is a more comfort, assertive obama than we saw six months ago. >> i thought it was noteworthy at the press conference when he talked about the kind of mandate he thought he had. he said i will be a better second-term president than first-term president-- he said know well about the research of second-term presidents who tend to overreach. but he still did say i have this mandate. the american people re-elect me to fight for the middle class. and you can tell, you know, he hasn't said what he said when he was first elected that we've heard him say-- elections have consequences -- but actions speak louder than words now. >> yeah, i think
it was attacked. a c.i.a. drone crashed inside iran last year. in syria, president bashar al- assad vowed he will not leave the country to go into exile. he spoke in an interview with "russia today t.v." earlier this week, british prime minister david cameron suggested giving assad safe passage out of syria, if that would guarantee an end to the war. but the syrian leader flatly rejected the idea. he said, "i am syrian and i will live and die in syria." those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to jeff. >> brown: after the vote, where does the republican party go from here? one thing it clearly faces: a changing electorate.9 exit polls showed that mitt romney lost every demographic-- blacks, hispanics, and asians-- other than white voters, who favored the republican nominee. romney won among older voters, but the president led among those under age 44. and he captured 60% of the 18- to 29-year-old vote, which turned out in greater numbers than in 2008. exit polls also sampled attitudes on the tea party. 21% said they support the movement. 30% opposed it and 42% declared themselves
.s. consulate in benghazi, libya. there've been reports the cia told its security officers to "stand down" and not try to repel the attackers. senior intelligence officials denied that on thursday. they said a security team responded within 25 minutes, even though they were outmanned and outgunned. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to judy. >> woodruff: this was another difficult day in the aftermath of hurricane sandy. the u.s. death toll rose to at least 102, and for millions of people, basic needs became increasingly urgent. ray suarez has the story. >> suarez: four days after sandy hit, patience was in short supply. so were gasoline, electricity and clean water. again today, car after car after car waited long hours at gas stations in new york and new jersey. >> it's crazy because people are fighting, they jumping in front of each other, they want to get out of their car and fight you, so you going to have to stand in line to get gas or you won't get none. >> suarez: this afternoon, in hard-hit ocean county, new jersey, governor chris christie promised help. >> we a
the world. >> he and his people reviewed all existing ongoing cia covert operations, and with the exception of aggressive interrogations, endorsed all of them, and doubled down on a number of them. >> narrator: targeted killings by drones, covert special forces raids overseas, cyber-warfare. president obama authorized it all in secret. >> the man who americans had elected to end two wars and who was in fact winding down the iraq war was also beginning to rev up these secret wars. >> he's the first nobel peace prize winner with a kill list. and it is very disappointing to his base. it is very disappointing to the civil liberties supporters who thought he was going to be much more of a stereotypical liberal. >> narrator: and for president obama, it would lead to one defining triumph. >> good evening. the united states has conducted an operation that killed osama bin laden... >> narrator: the killing of osama bin laden in the spring of 2011 was a high point. >> thank you and god bless the united states of america. >> narrator: but the clashes with republicans in washington did not go away. >>
Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)